About

 

Hey, is that…Temporal Radiation? No, it’s just a bug.

SF writer and Silent Motion Picture Actor, Trent Jamieson should be 111 years old, but is only 41 on account of TEMPORAL RADIATION.

He lives in Brisbane with his wife, Diana, where he wrote the Death Works Trilogy published by Orbit Books. He is the author of the Death Works Series. They’re about Death – you know, the Grim Reaper – and they’re set in Brisbane.

Death Works 4, The Memory of Death is due to be published by Momentum February 2014.

He has also just finished a Steampunkish secondary world fantasy duology for Angry Robot Books. The books, Roil and  Night’s Engines both are now available. If you like the steam, and the punk, you might like `em.

He is currently working on the novel Day Boy, slated for publication with Text Publishing in 2015 (if he doesn’t screw up this draft).

 

When not writing, he works at The Avid Reader Bookshop in West End- the best indie bookshop in the world (he’s not biased or anything).

His agent is Sophie Hamley at Cameron’s Management .

Trent can be contacted at teacupthrenody at hotmail dot com

Who the hell is that creepy looking guy?

Oh, and despite what wikipedia or Google say, I was born in Gunnedah, not Newcastle.

 

 

14 Responses to About

  1. hello – do you have a distributor in NZ -Neilsen Bookdata do not list one

    any help would be great
    thanks

  2. Trent Jamieson says:

    Hi Mary,

    The Death Works books are distributed by Alliance Distribution Services (well, they are in Australia). My publisher is part of Hachette. Hope that helps.

  3. Shane M says:

    I just noticed you look like Edward Norton and Johhny Depp’s Love child, just saw the pictures on TmZ and you are a dead ringer.
    Did you get the TEMPORAL RADIATION from hanging with Nikola Tesla and Einstein? He was born in Tasmania you know, saw it in that doco, Young Einstein

  4. Trent Jamieson says:

    Ah, my secret(s) is (are) out.

  5. Shelleyrae says:

    Hi
    I came to poke around but was attacked by warnings from McAfee that your site was suspicious. It may be a comment on on your writing LOL but in case you might want to go and assure them your site is safe, unless of course it’s not…

    http://www.siteadvisor.com/sites/trentjamieson.com?pip=false&premium=true&client_uid=1469960023&client_ver=3.3.1.131&client_type=IEPlugin&suite=true&aff_id=0&locale=en_au&os_ver=6.0.2.0

  6. Trent Jamieson says:

    Hmm, that’s curious. I’ll check it out. It seems to suggest that I’m sending out spammy emails, which I certainly don’t.

  7. Jeremy Lloyd says:

    Hey… Just wanted to let you know that I appreciated your time that you spent talking to us today at the Loganholme. I’m also a Science Fiction writer and I’ve only been writing for just around 3 months now, but I have spent my entire life dreaming and imagining stories over and over again in my head (to the point of insanity.)

    At the moment I’m around the 50,000 word mark and counting. Every second of the day I’m thinking new elements to my story, writing has become my passion as I’m sure that it has already become yours. Unfortunately I had to work right after and didn’t have time to talk with you. I was hoping that you would be able to give me a few names of some great authors (Other then yourself) and books that would be great to read and to learn from.

    P.S. I was the tall looking young guy at the back row.

  8. Trent Jamieson says:

    Hey Jeremy,

    glad you could come. And where to begin! Starting with Australian Authors there’s Sean Williams and Marianne de Pierres (if you’re interest is Science Fiction, they’re two of the finest). For fantasy there’s Rowena Cory Daniels, Kylie Chan, Tansy Rayner Roberts, Margo Lanagan, Kirsten Bishop, Kaaron Warren (most of these authors I have links to down the side of the webpage, and are friends so I am biased).

    Internationally, Alastair Reynolds, Iain Banks, Daniel Abraham, Cat Valente,Jeff Vandermeer, Kelly Link, Gail Carringer, Mj Harrison, Ursula Le Guin (who also has an excellent book on writing called Steering the Craft) and China Mieville. That’s just off the top of my head. All of these writers can teach you something, and everyone will teach you something different. And they should all be in the library if you can’t find them on the shelves at your local bookshop.

    Good luck with your writing!

  9. Jeremy Lloyd says:

    Thanks. Hope to talk to you in the future. Getting ready to write up a storm!

  10. Trent Jamieson says:

    Good luck!

  11. chuck says:

    Probably a sucky question to ask…But here goes. I got all your books in Mass Market Paperback – the little ones….I know your latest has been out for just a bit, but will you still publish a littleER version for the anal retentive like me who likes his books the same height?

    Thanks.

  12. Trent Jamieson says:

    There’s no sucky questions!Sorry, there’s no plans to publish it on its own in that format – that one’s out of my control. Whatever you decide, thanks for buying the first two books!

  13. Susan K Sutherland says:

    Hello Trent

    re: short story crafting tuition

    Just found Death Most Definite at our local library. Loving it! I live in a small regional area in Qld which has a school of 70 students and cows, sheep, kangaroos and not much else. I’m trying to become a writer – that is one that can submit my work without a red face and apologies. I am loving Death Most Definite because paranormal is my favourite read and I grew up, worked and played in Brisbane so it has a wonderful sense of place for me. It’s great to actually know all the places the characters are in – strange but nice to have all that paranormal weird stuff going in in a familiar environment. This doesn’t usually happen for me as I’ve never been to New York where most of this genre seems to live!

    I and my fellow emerging (as least we hope we will) writers are seeking master class level tuition for short stories. I read you have published over seventy short stories and won Aurealis Awards and teach creative writing. My question is, do you teach online? And are you interested in teaching about the short story craft? We are spread all over the place and away from major cities, so online is the only option. There seems to be options for face to face if you can travel to the cities but nothing much focussed specifically on Australian short stories online for regional people hours away from a major city. The Writers Centres seem to be focussed on entry general CWR I and II and then children’s writing and genre novel writing mainly.

    Hope you can help or point me in the right direction please?

    Many thanks.

    Cheers
    Susan K Sutherland

  14. Trent says:

    Good lord, Susan, sorry this ended up in my junk file. I’ve taught short story writing, but right now I really don’t have the time. I tend to find that the Qld Writers Centre offers quite a range of courses, and they’re always on the look out for ideas. If you feel something’s lacking it’s always a good idea to let them know!I grew up in regional NSW so I know how you feel.My best advice is to read as much short fiction as you can (which shouldn’t be hard) find some other writers and start critiquing each others work. You’ll soon know who is a good fit for you as a critiquer. An excellent book to read is Ursula Le Guin’s Steering the Craft (a wonderful guide to writing in general), it’s also designed to be used as short course in writing – the exercises in the book are instructive, playful, and will teach you a lot!

    Hope that’s some use, Susan.

    Trent

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